Jacob Kauffman

Reporter / Anchor

Jacob Kauffman is a reporter and anchor for KUAR. He primarily covers the state legislature and politics beat while juggling anchoring All Things Considered Monday through Friday afternoons. 

Jacob is a long-time Little Rock resident who started out working with Hendrix College's KHDX and the Arkansas Legislative Digest. His work (or portions of it) has appeared on NPR, our other wonderful public radio stations across Arkansas, PBS News Hour, TalkBusiness.net, Arkansas Money & Politics Magazine, ArkansasBlog.com, and the Nashville News. He also runs KUAR's Arkansas Politics Blog.

He regularly appears on Arkansas Educational Television Network's (AETN) weekly roundtable politics program Arkansas Week. Jacob also serves on the board of the MacArthur Military History Museum. If you see him you should ask him about the experience of German-Arkansans during World War I.

Phone: 501-683-7393

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Arkansas Education Commissioner Johnny Key testifying to a joint meeting of the Education Committees.
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR

A plan to scale back bonus pay for Arkansas teachers with National Board Certification was withdrawn on Monday under the direction of the governor’s office. The proposed revision from the state Department of Education was also under pressure from both the state’s largest union and non-union teachers groups.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson (center) signs a black history month declaration while sitting beside State Sen. Linda Chesterfield (right).
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR

Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson used the stature of his office to commemorate Black History month with African-American leaders and dozens of school children at the Capitol, Monday. The governor signed a declaration and lent his voice.

“It is not a time for African-Americans to celebrate your own history by yourself. It is a time that you share African-American history with everyone else,” said Hutchinson.

The Republican governor said everyone must be vigilant in protecting the gains of the past.

The cover of the book Arkansas/Arkansaw by Brooks Blevins (2009).
Univ. of Arkansas Press

This week Governor Asa Hutchinson rolled out another tool in his Arkansas boosterism arsenal unveiling the branding campaign "Arkansas Inc." He has about 180 years of a contradictory image to compete with but he intends to join former governors Charles Brough (champion of the early Wonder State moniker) and Winthrop Rockefeller in trying to do so.

Donald Trump speaking at Barton Coliseum in Little Rock, Arkansas.
Brian Chilson / Arkansas Times

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump told thousands in Arkansas Wednesday night that the Clintons have abandoned their home state. Trump also further laid out claims Texas Senator Ted Cruz stole the Iowa caucus. 

“Give it up, for your next president of the United States of America, Donald J. Trump! Yes! Yes! Yes!," shouted Trump's opening hype man Jonathan Conneely, the founder of a fitness regime for first responders who calls himself Coach JC.

Lt. Gov Tim Griffin (R-Ark) outside his office.
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR News

Former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee is out of the Republican presidential primary and now his many endorsements from home-state officials are up for grabs before the March 1 Arkansas primary.

Huckabee came in 9th at the Iowa caucus with 1.8 percent of the vote. Is it too early to pick through the bones of Huckabee’s failed bid? For what it’s worth...

Most of his supporter list said it’s premature to endorse a new candidate. But Lieutenant Governor Tim Griffin, while withholding a formal endorsement, heaped praise upon Marco Rubio during an interview with KUAR.

US Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-TX) at the 2012 Democratic National Convention.
CSPAN

We'll find out in a few hours just how premature it is to be considering Hillary Clinton's VP but one heavily-speculated about candidate's brother is headlining a campaign kick-off for two northwest Arkansas legislative candidates a few days after the Arkansas primary.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R) in August supporting his computer coding initiative.
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR

It’s a connection that hasn't been made explicitly by the governor but the push for computer coding education in Arkansas has a bit of a parallel in Washington D.C.

Governor Asa Hutchinson has touted his belief in computer coding from the campaign trail in Arkansas to gubernatorial boosterism tours of New York and California. This week President Barack Obama used his weekly address to do the same.

Arkansas AFL-CIO logo.
Arkansas AFL-CIO

A long-running contract between the Arkansas AFL-CIO and the state Department of Workforce Services to assist dislocated workers officially expires on Sunday. The department is taking the work in-house and projecting it will save $100,000 annually. Arkansas AFL-CIO President Alan Hughes doesn’t doubt the state will be capable of continuing the work but said the contract loss has some political underpinnings.

KUAR's Jacob Kauffman spoke with Hughes about the contract and role of organized labor in Republican Arkansas.

On this week's program:

--Some shake-ups at DHS: The state Child welfare director announces she’s resigning. A report shows negligence at a Booneville Human Development Center. And when will the agency get new leadership at the top?

--The politics of sentencing: How do Arkansas’s U.S. Senate candidates stand on mandatory minimums? 

---The Arkansas Medical Board changes some key terms in the state’s regulations on abortions. We’ll examine the reasons behind the decision and how it might sit with Republican lawmakers.

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