Karen Tricot Steward

Content Development Director

As Content Development Director, Karen Tricot Steward oversees the creation of news and cultural programming and helps set standards and best practices. She manages content on our website and social media. Karen also coordinates the internship program and collaborates with journalism professors at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock to teach students, helping fulfill public radio’s goal of serving the community by being a place of learning.

She started at KUAR in 2001 as a news reporter. She has also served as local host and news anchor for Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

For her news reporting, she has received several awards from the Arkansas Associated Press for stories on topics like the Little Rock mayoral race and Iraq War veterans in Arkansas. She also won a first place award from the Society of Professional Journalists for investigative reporting. Karen has a B.A. in Journalism from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

Phone: 501-569-8491

E-mail: karen@kuar.org

Ways to Connect

Power Bar and Ultra Lounge Mass Shooting
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

  

Little Rock police say 25 people were shot at a club called the Power Bar and Ultra Lounge early Saturday morning. There were no reported fatalities. Police said three others had injuries that were not from gun shots.  

The club is on the second floor of a building in downtown Little Rock located at 220 West 6th Street. 

Little Rock police say they do not believe the incident was terror-related or involved an active shooter, but resulted from a dispute, which could possibly be gang related. 

Bloomberg via Getty Images

The state's unemployment rate is at a record low of 3.4 %. Susan Price with the Arkansas Department of Workforce Services says unemployment has declined 0.1% every month this year and May figures fell in line.

“We started off the year at a record low rate of 3.8%, so each month has broken and set a new record. Unemployment in Arkansas has actually decreased each month since March 2011," said Susan Price with the Arkansas Department of Workforce Services.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee today, as the investigation continues into Russian attempts to influence the 2016 presidential election.

Sessions is expected to take questions about his recusal from the Russia investigation, his own meetings with Russian officials, and what if anything he knew about a private Oval Office meeting between President Trump and fired FBI Director James Comey.

Arkansas Republicans are roundly cheering President Trump's decision to join forces with Syria and withdraw from a worldwide climate change accord. Mayors in Little Rock and Fayetteville take a different tone and pledge to keep the course set under the previous administration.

The podcast also delves into the first movement in the 2018 U.S. House race in central Arkansas. Paul Spencer launched an exploratory committee as a Democrat and Natashia Burch Hulsey prepares for an independent bid.

Little Rock Mayor Mark Stodola and Fayetteville Mayor Lioneld Jordan joined a group of mayors from around the nation to condemn President Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement.

They signed an open letter as part of the Mayors National Climate Action Agenda to "adopt, honor and uphold Paris Climate Agreement goals."

Tesla

A high-powered charging station for Tesla electric cars is under construction in Little Rock.

It's meant to fill a large gap in the company's network of Supercharger stations around the country.

Teresa Hendrix, the general manager of the Outlets of Little Rock where the charging station will be housed, says it will finally enable routes through Arkansas.

Sarah Whites-Koditschek / Arkansas Public Media

The execution of inmate Kenneth Williams on Thursday night has prompted calls for an investigation after reports that he was lurching and convulsing about 3 minutes into the lethal injection process.

Williams is the fourth convicted killer put to death in Arkansas over a period of 8 days.

What happened last night, and how is it linked to a controversial drug used in the deadly three-drug cocktail? We'll explain.

A spokesman for the governor, J.R. Davis, and a spokesman for the Arkansas Department of Correction, Soloman Graves, update the media on the status of the execution.
Sarah Whites-Koditschek

Arkansas has carried out its final execution for the month of April.

Eight death row inmates were scheduled to die in less than two weeks in Arkansas in four double executions. Ultimately, four inmates were executed, including one double execution.

Death row inmate Kenneth Williams, 38, was pronounced dead at 11:05 p.m.  The lethal injection began at 10:52 p.m.

Williams' execution, which had been scheduled for 7 p.m., was on hold while the U.S. Supreme Court reviewed legal challenges. It ultimately denied all claims.

Arkansas has carried out its first execution since 2005, just four minutes before the inmate's death warrant was set to expire.

Ledell Lee's execution was scheduled for 7 p.m., but an evening of appeals kept him alive longer. The U.S. Supreme Court nearly halted his execution at one point in the evening but ultimately decided, 5 to 4, that the state could proceed.

"A lethal injection was administered at 11:44 p.m. and the coroner pronounced Ledell Lee dead at 11:56 p.m.," announced Soloman Graves, a spokesman for the Arkansas Department of Correction.

On Friday, a judge in Arkansas halted the scheduled executions of seven death row inmates. The executions were scheduled to begin today and be carried out over 11 days. The men had been fast-tracked because the state's supply of the controversial drug, midazolam, is set to expire at the end of the month.

Pages