Karen Tricot Steward

Content Development Director

As Content Development Director, Karen Tricot Steward oversees the creation of news and cultural programming and helps set standards and best practices. She manages content on our website and social media. Karen also coordinates the internship program and collaborates with journalism professors at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock to teach students, helping fulfill public radio’s goal of serving the community by being a place of learning.

She started at KUAR in 2001 as a news reporter. She has also served as local host and news anchor for Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

For her news reporting, she has received several awards from the Arkansas Associated Press for stories on topics like the Little Rock mayoral race and Iraq War veterans in Arkansas. She also won a first place award from the Society of Professional Journalists for investigative reporting. Karen has a B.A. in Journalism from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

Phone: 501-569-8491

E-mail: karen@kuar.org

Ways to Connect

Governor Asa Hutchinson
Karen Tricot Steward / Arkansas Public Media

Governor Asa Hutchinson spoke to the media for an hour Thursday, saying he has visited with officials at the Arkansas Department of Correction and now has great confidence that the seven executions set for this month will be carried out successfully.

"I reviewed the protocols, procedures and training. But, obviously there's contingency plans. That's why we have communication directly from the chambers there to my office," said Hutchinson.

Seven Arkansas inmates are scheduled to be executed over 11 days this month, starting Monday.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson is to talk with reporters Thursday morning about the pending executions of seven death row inmates. The governor scheduled the lethal injections over a 10-day period before the state's supply of one of the drugs used in the process expires.

On Wednesday, April 5, NPR launches Up First, a daily 10-minute morning news podcast available by 5am CDT each day. The podcast is available on NPR One, iTunes, Alexa and other podcast platforms. 

NPR's Up First is the news you need to start your day. Expect the biggest stories and ideas, from politics to pop culture. The podcast is hosted by David Greene, Steve Inskeep and Rachel Martin, with reporting and analysis from NPR News.

Arkansas is set to conduct four double executions over ten days this month. That's already an unprecedented rate and in some states, like Oklahoma, double executions aren't even allowed.

In part two of our conversation with Sean Murphy, who covers executions for the Associated Press out of Oklahoma, Karen Tricot Steward talks to him about witnessing the highly-publicized botched execution of Clayton Lockett. That execution used the same controversial sedative Arkansas will use and put an end to back-to-back killings in that state. 

Controversy continues over Arkansas's rush to conduct four double executions in four days this month.

One issue raising concern is the use of the common sedative midazolam, marketed under the trade name Versed. The drug has been tied to botched executions where inmates wake up during the procedure. Some states have stopped using it altogether for lethal injections.

KUAR News spoke with Sean Murphy in Oklahoma, who covers executions for the Associated Press. He witnessed the highly-publicized botched execution of Clayton Lockett in 2014.

This edition of KUAR's Week In Review podcast tackles the winding down of the legislative session. Lawmakers retread the concealed carry debate and carve out an exception for athletic events, UAMS, and the state hospital despite NRA opposition. The online sales tax finally gets past a committee hurdle and the bathroom bill gets pushed aside for another time as does highway funding.

On the program:

-Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson signs a law to eventually bring concealed firearms into college campuses, the state capitol, stadiums and bars. How will the state adapt and who’s raising alarm?

-The Governor also puts pen to paper on a law officially separating Robert E. Lee and Martin Luther King.

-As planned executions for eight state inmates over ten days draws closer, we look at failed efforts to outlaw or limit capital punishment in Arkansas.

A relatively new nonprofit news organization focusing on issues surrounding the U.S. criminal justice system is tracking the cases of death row inmates scheduled to be executed in Arkansas and nine other states. 

The Marshall Project collaborates with other news outlets and journalists to publish investigative reports on national controversy and reform within the criminal justice system.

Across the country, women in their 30s are having babies at the highest rate since the 1960s, according to data collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In Arkansas, the number of births in 2015 among women age 30 to 39 was 11,215. This is a 22.9% jump since 2007. 

Also, the number of births to women of other ages in Arkansas in 2015 was 27,671. This is a 14.2% decline since 2007. 

On this edition of KUAR's Week-In-Review podcast, we explore the state's decision to schedule execution dates for eight inmates over a period of ten days. The Death Penalty Information Center says that's an unprecedented timetable for executions since the U.S. resumed capital punishment in 1977.

Why the hurry?  What’s the status of execution drugs, and do the inmates have any appeals left?

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