Karen Tricot Steward

Content Development Director

As Content Development Director, Karen Tricot Steward helps with the creation of news and cultural programming and helps set standards and best practices. She manages digital content on our website and social media platforms. She also works with local program producers and people who pitch programming ideas to public radio. In addition, Karen coordinates the internship program, helping fulfill public radio’s goal of serving the community by being a place of learning.

She started at KUAR in 2001 as a news reporter. She has also served as local host and news anchor during Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

For her news reporting, she has won several awards from the Arkansas Associated Press for stories on topics like the Little Rock mayoral race and Iraq war veterans in Arkansas. She also won a first place award from the Society of Professional Journalists for investigative reporting. Karen has worked at Stone Ward, an advertising agency in Little Rock, as well as for the University of Utah and the University of Iowa. Karen has a B.A. in Journalism from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

Phone: 501-569-8491

E-mail: karen@kuar.org

Ways To Connect

An Arkansas pipeline spill that coated streets and lawns with a smelly, asphalt-like crude oil provides opponents of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline with new ammunition to combat the project.

Brad Olson, energy reporter for Bloomberg News, gives analysis of Arkansas oil spill.

Three days after an Exxon pipeline in Central Arkansas burst and soaked the town of Mayflower in thousands of barrels of crude oil, the cleanup is ongoing.

A resident who lives close to the scene of the oil spill gives this account:

"I live on Highway 365, adjacent to the interstate, in Mayflower. First of all, I feel thankful that the men and women of my community, who have no special training or local oversight, were able to work together and pull resources to contain the oil. When I exited the interstate on my way home on Friday at around 3:30 pm, the oil smell came on all at once.

A case of E. coli has been reported in Arkansas.

A duck before her bath.
HAWK Facebook Page

As cleanup efforts continue after the oil spill in Mayflower, Exxon is calling on various community groups for help.

Lynne Slater is the Executive Director of HAWK Center in Russellville. Her group is an all-volunteer organization with experience in wildlife rehabilitation. 

Slater says Exxon contacted her organization over the weekend to see if they could transport animals covered in oil to her facility for cleaning and monitoring.

KUAR is looking for the stories of residents affected by the Mayflower oil spill.

Were you evacuated? Do you have friends and/or family members who were impacted?

Leave a comment below, on our Facebook page, or e-mail news@ualrpublicradio.org

kindergarten
Flickr.com

A new study by the non-profit Education Commission of the States on state kindergarten policies finds Arkansas is ahead of the game in many areas.

The kindergarten report's findings highlight the significant diversity that exists in state kindergarten policies across states.

Two areas that were studied were whether states must offer full-day kindergarten and whether children must attend kindergarten.

Emily Workman is the study’s author.

Mayflower Oil Spill
KLRT/ Fox 16 Facebook Page

A crude oil pipeline ruptured this afternoon near Mayflower, causing oil to spill into Lake Conway.

Haz-Mat crews are on the scene near Mayflower in Faulkner County.

Brandon Morris with the Arkansas Department of Emergency Management says Exxon owns the pipeline.

Morris says the Haz-Mat crews are evaluating the situation, and will likely call on the Department of Environmental Quality to do an assessment of the lake and the surrounding area.

There’s no word yet on how much oil spilled or what caused the pipeline to burst.

A new online technology is helping Arkansans fund community projects and local business efforts.

The technology is called crowdsourcing, and it’s a method in which funds for local projects are raised through a large online network of people who want the projects to be successful. Small contributions by many people end up translating into lots of money.

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