Nathan Vandiver

Interim General Manager / Program Director

Nathan Vandiver is Program Director for UALR Public Radio, which includes KUAR 89.1 and KLRE Classical 90.5.

He oversees the quality of our on-air sound and is responsible for developing and maintaining programming policy, supervising programming staff, and selecting programs for UALR Public Radio.

Email: nathan@kuar.org

Phone: 501-683-7389

Ways to Connect

Nathan Vandiver / KUAR

The state’s Division of Legislative Audit will conduct a special report for lawmakers to assess the early days of enrollment into Arkansas’s Private Option Medicaid expansion plan.

The Legislative Joint Auditing Committee approved the special report Friday.

Supporters of the Private Option, including Representative Reginald Murdoch, asked whether the audit report of such a new program was meant to hamper its implementation.

This weekend, KUAR is bringing two new programs from NPR to its airwaves with the TED Radio Hour and Latino USA.

Ira Glass, host of Public Radio International's This American Life, will be in Memphis October 5 for an event at the Orpheum Theatre.

Congratulations to the lucky listeners and members who won tickets. If you still want tickets, you can purchase them at the Orpheum's website.

The event is presented by Memphis public radio station WKNO. 

npr.org

Beginning Tuesday, Sept. 10, KUAR will add NPR's All Songs Considered to its Tuesday evening schedule.

All Songs Considered is hosted by Bob Boilen and Robin Hilton. Along with occasional guests, they curate the best of what's new in popular music for the public radio audience.

Ari Daniel Shapiro / Burn: An Energy Diary

This Fourth of July, KUAR FM 89 will air 'The Switch: The Story of Our National Power Grid' from the program 'Burn: An Energy Diary.'

Host Alex Chadwick and the producers at Burn take a look at the nation's aging power grid, how it works and how it doesn't, Thursday, July 4 at 3 p.m.

The program will cover smart grids, alternative energy and the people who keep the grid running all on a day when the grid will be humming to keep up with the nation's energy demand.

Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography / WBUR/NPR

A note to listeners from Interim Program Director Nathan Vandiver:

As announced earlier by NPR, Talk of the Nation leaves the air as of Thursday, June 27 and though it will be missed, its departure gives KUAR the opportunity to bring the voice and perspective of a new show to the central Arkansas airwaves.

A report from the CDC and the National Center for Health Statistics says teen birthrates are dropping in the US in all but two states.

Arkansas is among the states where the rate is dropping, but it has one of the highest rates.

Arkansas had a 16 percent decline in overall teen births between 2007 and 2011.

Brady Hamilton, a statistician with the National Center for Health Statistics, says the study can help shape public policy regarding teen pregnancy.

As the citizens of Moore, Oklahoma work to clean up the damage and rebuild following the tornado that destroyed part of the town this week, help is pouring in from surrounding areas.

One person on the University of Arkansas at Little Rock campus is helping.

Leanna Payton, who works in student housing is gathering odds and ends like toiletries, diapers and cell phone chargers to take to Moore. She plans to fill a van with the items.

Robert Nelson / Flickr.com

Thursday the University of Arkansas System Board of Trustees is scheduled to meet and vote on whether to allow permitted faculty and staff to carry concealed handguns on its campuses throughout the state.

The Arkansas State University Board is also expected to vote on the matter Thursday.

The state legislature recently passed a law that gives colleges the choice, though all schools that have voted so far have opted out of allowing concealed weapons on campus.

Nathan Vandiver / KUAR

US Attorney for the Eastern District of Arkansas Chris Thyer said Monday that allegations against state Treasurer Martha Shoffner are grave.

He spoke to reporters after Shoffner made her initial court appearance on charges she accepted money from a broker in return for investing state money with that broker.

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