This Week, A Pretty Lepidoptera

Oct 5, 2014
Originally published on October 5, 2014 12:58 pm

On-air challenge: The word cho means "beautiful" in Korean and "butterfly" in Japanese. Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name based around "cho." Specifically, the first word of the answer starts with C and the second word starts HO.

Last week's challenge: Think of a 10-letter word that names an invention of the early 20th century, which includes an A and an O. Remove the A. Then move the O to where the A was, leaving a space where the O was, and you'll name a much more recent invention. What is it?

Answer: Cellophane/Cellphone

Winner: Eulalia Saucedo from Hacienda Heights, Calif.

Next week's challenge: Take the first four letters of a brand of toothpaste plus the last five letters of an over-the-counter medicine, and together, in order, the result will name a popular beverage. What is it?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday at 3 p.m. Eastern.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro. The puzzle is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're going to get. OK, that's a stretch. But there is a connection between chocolates and the puzzle, which I will explain in a moment. First let me bring in Will Shortz. Of course, he's the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master. Good morning, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Ari. Now tell me - first of all, it's great to have you back on the show.

SHAPIRO: Thank you.

SHORTZ: How many times has your name been in The New York Times crossword?

SHAPIRO: Oh, thank you so much for that. I have to tell you, like, that makes my day. When people tell me I'm in The New York Times crossword puzzle, I feel like I can drop the mic and walk off the stage. That's it.

SHORTZ: There you go. You've got a great name too - A-R-I, you know, fortunately, you're names not, you know...

SHAPIRO: Jonathan.

SHORTZ: Yeah. I'd never get that in.

SHAPIRO: Ezekiel. No, I'm grateful to my parents for giving me a three letter name with two vowels and an unusual one at that. Will, remind us what last week's challenge was.

SHORTZ: Yes. It came from listener Henry Hook. And I said think of a 10-letter word that names an invention of the early 20th century, which includes an A and an O. I said remove the A, then move the O to where the A was, leaving a space where the O was and you'll name a much more recent invention. What is it?

SHAPIRO: And what is it?

SHORTZ: Well, that invention, I think it was in 1900, was cellophane. And you make that vowel switch, you get a cell phone.

SHAPIRO: And here's a fact that, Will, you might not know. Cellophane was first used in the United States of America in a Whitman's sampler box of chocolates.

SHORTZ: There you go.

SHAPIRO: And for years, it was the largest single user of cellophane in the United States.

SHORTZ: Did not know that.

SHAPIRO: At any rate, we receive more than 1,300 correct entries. And our winner picked at random is Eulalia Saucedo from Hacienda Heights, California. Congratulations Eulalia.

EULALIA SAUCEDO: Oh, thank you so much, Ari.

SHAPIRO: What a beautiful name.

SAUCEDO: Oh, thank you. You're very sweet.

SHAPIRO: Eulalia, how did you get the answer cell phone and cellophane.

SAUCEDO: Well, I went through 10-letter words that I kind thought were maybe early 20th century inventions - things like automobile that didn't work out as well. I did a project on cellophane, though, several years ago when I was a physics major in college. And I remembered it was made around the year 1900, and it worked out perfectly.

SHAPIRO: How long have you been playing the puzzle?

SAUCEDO: Three years.

SHAPIRO: Three years. And do you usually get the challenge?

SAUCEDO: No, I don't. This is my first time actually.

SHAPIRO: Wait, this was your first time sending in the answer and you...

SAUCEDO: Yeah. It was my first time.

SHAPIRO: Wow. Congratulations.

SAUCEDO: Well, thank you.

SHAPIRO: Well, you ready to play?

SAUCEDO: I am, absolutely.

SHAPIRO: OK, Will, let's do it.

SHORTZ: All right, Eulalia and Ari, the word cho - C-H-O means butterfly in Japanese. Every answer today is a familiar two-word phrase or name based around cho, and specifically, the first word of the answer starts with C and the second word starts H-O. For example, if I said a place to live outside the city, you would say country house.

SHAPIRO: You ready, Eulalia?

SAUCEDO: I think so.

SHAPIRO: OK, let's do it.

SHORTZ: All right, number one, pirate in "Peter Pan."

SAUCEDO: Captain Hook.

SHAPIRO: Ai, ai.

SHORTZ: That is. Nice. Number two, southernmost point of South America.

SAUCEDO: Southernmost point of South America. Cape...

SHORTZ: Yes.

SAUCEDO: Cape...

SHORTZ: And what's on the front of a unicorn?

SAUCEDO: Horn.

SHAPIRO: Nice.

SHORTZ: There you go. Cape Horn. All right, try this - it produces a toot on the street.

SAUCEDO: Car horn.

SHORTZ: Car horn is it.

SHAPIRO: Oh.

SHORTZ: Caesar's Palace or the Tropicana.

SAUCEDO: Caesar's Palace, a casino hotel.

SHORTZ: Yes. Casino hotel. Something to ride on a merry-go-round.

SAUCEDO: A - something to ride on a merry-go-round - horses the last word.

SHORTZ: Um-hm, and what is it?

SAUCEDO: Carousel horse.

SHORTZ: A carousel horse, yes.

SHAPIRO: You are blazing through these.

SAUCEDO: Well, thanks.

SHAPIRO: All right, try this. 1978 film starring Jane's Fonda and John Voight about a Vietnam veteran.

SHAPIRO: Oh.

SAUCEDO: Oh, does it start with captain or captive.

SHORTZ: No. What year were you born, Eulalia?

SAUCEDO: 1985.

SHORTZ: Oh, well, there's a reason you might not know this.

(LAUGHTER)

SHAPIRO: And I was born in '78 so I'm not much more help I'm afraid.

SAUCEDO: Okay.

SHORTZ: You were zero when this came out. OK. It's "Coming Home."

SHAPIRO: "Coming Home."

SHORTZ: It was a classic.

SAUCEDO: "Coming Home," would have never got it.

SHORTZ: OK. How about an institution where a pediatrician may work?

SAUCEDO: A children's hospital.

SHAPIRO: Nice.

SHORTZ: Excellent. Medical drama of 1990s TV.

SHAPIRO: Oh, starring Mandy Patinkin.

SAUCEDO: "Chicago Hope."

SHORTZ: That's it.

SAUCEDO: Wow.

SHORTZ: Support for tapered lights made of wax.

SAUCEDO: Candle holder.

SHORTZ: That's it. And here's your last one. It's the two title characters of a comic strip about a boy and his stuffed tiger.

SHAPIRO: Oh.

SAUCEDO: Calvin and Hobbes.

SHORTZ: Calvin and Hobbes. Nice job.

SHAPIRO: Nice. Eulalia, that was amazing.

SAUCEDO: Oh, it was a lot of fun.

SHORTZ: Well, Eulalia, for playing the puzzle today, you get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, puzzle books and games. And you can find out more about these prizes at npr.org/puzzle. Tell what public radio station you listen to.

SAUCEDO: KPCC.

SHORTZ: Thanks for playing with us, Eulalia.

SAUCEDO: Thank you so much, Ari. Thank you, Will.

SHAPIRO: And, Will, give us the challenge for the week ahead.

SHORTZ: Yes. Take the first four letters of a brand of toothpaste plus the last five letters of an over-the-counter medicine and together, in order, the result will name a popular beverage. What is it? So again the first four letters of a brand of toothpaste plus the last five letters of an over-the-counter medicine. And together they'll name a popular beverage. What beverage is it?

SHAPIRO: Well, when you have the answer, go to our website, npr.org/puzzle and click on the submit your answer link. Just one entry per person please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday October 9 at 3 p.m. Eastern time. Please include a phone number where we can reach you around that time. If you're the winner, we'll give you a call, and you will get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master, Will Shortz. Thanks, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Ari. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.