Arts & Letters

Arts & Letters is a special program hosted by associate professor Brad Minnick of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. It highlights the arts, humanities, and social sciences. The program's theme music was composed by The Damsels in Distress.

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Carlisle/Fletcher

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Listen to the episode on Friday, November 24 at 7:00 p.m. CST on KUAR 89.1

On this episode of Arts & Letters, we talk with writer, actor, and folksinger Willi Carlisle and director and designer Joseph Fletcher. Their one-man operetta There Ain't No More! Death of a Folksinger chronicles an aging folksinger's last performance in front of an audience.

Throughout the performance, this raconteur called "Our Hero" delights the audience with off-color jokes and stories from his past. 

Yeah Boy

Nov 5, 2017
LSU Press

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The Dark Lyricism of Arkansas poet Greg Brownderville 

On this episode of Arts & Letters, we talk with poet Greg Alan Brownderville, who discusses his latest collection, A Horse With Holes in It, published by LSU Press. This collection is interwoven with humor, compelling imagery and dark lyricism. 

 

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On this episode of Arts & Letters, we speak with artist Robert McCann who talks about his paintings, which interrogate the drama that is entertainment culture and place us smack down between studio wrestling and external ideas of contemporary spaces. 

 

M. E. Kubit

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Hot Springs singer songwriter Ryan Sauders and guitarist Keith West  sat down with J. Bradley Minnick, host of KUAR's Arts & Letters, to discuss a very difficult subject: suicide of loved ones and how it permeates much of Ryan's lyrics and music.

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On this episode of Arts & Letters, we talk with Trenton Lee Stewart, author of the bestselling The Mysterious Benedict Society series.

Head shot of Sen. Caraway with gavel in hand
New York Times

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On this episode of Arts & Letters, we talk with writer, academic and actor Dr. Nancy Hendricks, who sings the praises of the first elected U.S. female Senator, Hattie Caraway  (1878-1950). 

Dr. Nancy Hendricks is the author of Senator Hattie Caraway: An Arkansas Legacy, published by The History Press.  

Hendricks: 

Cover of The Boy and The Firefly
L. K. Sukany

On this episode of Arts & Letters, we talk with the husband and wife team, performers, musicians, and writers Lauren and Micah Sukany.

The Boy and the Firefly is their multimedia children's book: a fractured fairytale--a postmodern bedtime story for our modern times, complete with original music and illustrations.

These Jungian dream-tales are filled with fireflies, bicycles, brooms, princes, princesses and damsels in distress.

Connected as dreams, these stories stitch together the waking life with the dream life. . . "for everyone dreams." 

A&L Short: Bonnie Montgomery

Jun 18, 2017
Mary Ellen Kubit

On this Arts & Letters short, which aired on Father's Day, we visit a 2016 interview with singer and songwriter Bonnie Montgomery. She and J. Bradley Minnick talked about the importance of song and reflected on the enduring memory of her father. 

Stillness Falling Like Calamity

Jun 16, 2017

On this episode of Arts & Letters, Arkansas Poet Jo McDougall discusses the farm, family, and the everyday mystery that poetry explores. 

McDougall is the author of several collections of poetry, as well as Daddy's Money, A Memoir of Farm and Family. The memoir, published by the University of Arkansas Press in 2011, explores her early life growing up on a rice farm outside the town of Dewitt, Arkansas. Her book of collected poems, In the Home of the Famous Dead, was published by the University of Arkansas Press in 2015.

On this episode of Arts & Letters, we talk with Nashville-based YA author Jeff Zentner. His book, The Serpent King, is filled with big hearted characters, misfits and miscreants cornered by the crushing weight of destiny, “the ossifying conviction that they are living out some ancient and preordained plan—encoded in blood, built into the architecture of name.”

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