Arkansas Arts

Japanese-American Internment Camp
Butler Center for Arkansas Studies

During World War II more than 100,000 Japanese-Americans who had done nothing wrong, but were deemed a threat to the United States, were housed in internment camps. Two of the 10 camps were located in Arkansas. An exhibit opening Friday night in Little Rock helps to visualize the experience by showing artwork created by those held at the Rohwer Relocation Center in southeast Arkansas.

The Holly Jolly Trolley: A Ride Through Arkansas History

Dec 21, 2016
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

On this special holiday episode of Arts & Letters, we uncover true tales of Arkansas's past while touring the streets of Little Rock and North Little Rock inside the Rock Region Metro Streetcar—our “Holly Jolly Trolley.”

 

Along the streetcar rails we enounter a cast of characters, who tell of the cities' history bound up in the brick and mortar of the buildings—filled with ghosts and song.

 

Asa Hutchinson
Arkansas Times

The following is a transcript of Gov. Asa Hutchinson's radio column for the weekend of Nov. 18, 2016:

Arkansas has a rich history of leaders whose contributions have done much to increase the quality of life for the people of our state. From business leaders who employed tens of thousands across generations to philanthropists whose gifts have made the arts accessible to all Arkansans, these leader’s contributions have made their mark.

Robinson Center Arkansas Symphony Orchestra
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

The first performance at the newly renovated Robinson Center Performance Hall will take place Saturday. A key goal of the $70 million project has been to improve the acoustics of the Little Rock-owned venue that was built in 1939. Those attending the show by the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra will get to judge for themselves.

A&L Short: Brian Nahlen

Nov 14, 2016
Mary Ellen Kubit

Little Rock singer-songwriter Brian Nahlen in his song “Cicada Moon” explores the idea that humans got their sense of rhythm and synchronization from the world of insect sounds that have surrounded our species over the millions of years we’ve evolved.

He sat down with J. Bradley Minnick of KUAR’s Arts & Letters to talk about his musical inspiration. 

Robinson Center
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

After a $70 million renovation, funded by a two percent rededicated advertising and promotion tax approved by voters in 2013, on Thursday the doors of an iconic Little Rock performance venue were reopened to the public.

Robinson Center
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

After nearly two and a half years of work, a ribbon cutting ceremony is set for Thursday at 10 a.m. for Little Rock's Robinson Center. A $70 million renovation is being completed on the auditorium which first opened in 1939.

“H. Clinton comm. report” by Jon Kennedy depicts Hillary Rodham Clinton and her commission report concerning new educational standards. December 15, 1983.
UALR Center for History and Culture

Many are familiar with the often unsophisticated world of newspaper comic strips but there are some comics with more thought – political and editorial cartoons. The University of Arkansas at Little Rock Center for History and Culture is out with a new virtual exhibit, “No Laughing Matter: Political Cartoons and the Arkansas Historical Perspective.” UALR historian, Dr. Barclay Key, joined KUAR’s Jacob Kauffman this week to talk cartoons.  

Robinson Center Gretchen Hall Arkansas Symphony Orchestra Christina Littlejohn
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Free tickets will be handed out Tuesday at 10 a.m. on the steps of the newly renovated Robinson Center in Little Rock for a thank you concert later this month by the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra. It comes as final work is being done before next week's grand reopening and ribbon cutting ceremony.

History of the Arkansas Gazette: Part One

Oct 21, 2016
Courtesy of the Center for Arkansas History and Culture

Today on Arts & Letters, we talk with journalist, researcher, and professor Donna Lampkin Stephens. Her book, If It Ain't Broke, Break It: How Corporate Journalism Killed the Arkansas Gazette, published by the University of Arkansas Press in 2015 "offers a firsthand account of how and why the Arkansas Gazette, then the oldest newspaper west of the Mississippi River, died after perhaps the country’s last great newspaper war."

Pages