Arkansas Civil Rights

25 years ago the federal Americans with Disabilities Act was signed into law. Complying with the Act is still a matter many public and private entities have to contend with in Arkansas. Below is a discussion with Bryan Ayres, director of the Technology and Curriculum Access Center at Easter Seals Arkansas about the legacy of the law.

 

 

You can learn more about Easter Seals and their advocacy work at their website.

The Confederate soldiers monument has a soldier holding a Confederate battle flag.
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR

In recent weeks, the battle over Confederate imagery has focused mainly on a flag, but for some the debate naturally extends to other symbols they see as offensive. As Arkansas, like many Southern states, continues to grapple with emblems of its past, the question arises: To what extent are monuments in public places an issue?

60th Anniversary Of Integration Of NE Arkansas School District

Jul 13, 2015
Hoxie 21
Johnathan Reaves / KASU

While Central High’s Little Rock Nine are remembered for their courage in 1957, the tiny northeast Arkansas town of Hoxie was first in the nation, peacefully integrating two years earlier. A ceremony over the weekend marked the 60th anniversary.

About 200 people gathered in the Hoxie High School gym to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the school district's integration.

Several of the black students who helped integrate the district also returned to the school for Saturday's event.

Known as the Hoxie 21, the students went to their new schools on July 11, 1955. The integration was peaceful at first, but two weeks later, white supremacists from out of town protested the move.

The struggle to integrate continued in 1957 as federal troops were called to help integrate Little Rock Central High School.

Van Buren County Courthouse.
flickr.com

Arkansas House Majority Leader Ken Bragg says there are no specific or immediate plans to respond legislatively to the US Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage. Bragg’s comments to KUAR on Wednesday follow a statement last week on behalf of the House Republican Caucus that called for a new look at additional so-called religious freedom laws.

Nearly a week after the U.S. Supreme Court issued a ruling that states must recognize and issue same-sex marriage licenses, most Arkansas county clerks are complying. KUAR conducted a brief survey of clerks offices on the number of same-sex or gender-neutral licenses issued in the state's 10 most populous counties.

Assistant Pro Tempore 1st District Senator Eddie Joe Williams (R-Cabot).
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR

Arkansas state Senate Republicans are working on legislation to reinforce protections for churches, religious organizations and religious schools in response to last week's U.S. Supreme Court ruling legalizing gay marriage nationwide.

Mo'ne Davis and her teammates in the 2014 Little League World Series have stopped in Little Rock as part of a civil rights tour.

The Philadelphia-based Anderson Monarchs are on a 23-day tour of landmarks of the civil rights movement and has made stops in Georgia and Alabama. The tour started June 17.

The team visited Little Rock Central High School on Sunday as part of the tour. Little Rock Central High School was desegregated in 1957 when nine black students were integrated into what was then an all-white school.

Below is a collection of statements on the SCOTUS marriage ruling issued by Arkansas-related politicians and elected officials.

LITTLE ROCK – Governor Asa Hutchinson released the statement below following the Supreme Court’s ruling on same-sex marriage:

Hutchinson Statement On Marriage Ruling

Jun 26, 2015

Governor Asa Hutchinson Issues Statement on Same-Sex Marriage Ruling

LITTLE ROCK – Governor Asa Hutchinson released the statement below following the Supreme Court’s ruling on same-sex marriage

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