Arkansas Civil Rights

The city of Little Rock is dedicating a new bench in honor of a 67-year-old black man who was fatally shot by two off-duty police officers in 2010.

The bench honoring Eugene Edward Ellison is located in MacArthur Park in downtown Little Rock. Earlier this year, the city reached a settlement with Ellison's family, and part of it called for a memorial bench in Ellison's honor.

Ellison was shot after two officers who were working security at the building entered Ellison's apartment without a warrant. Neither of the officers, who are both white, was criminally charged.

Arkansas athletic director Jeff Long said the university is backing six women's basketball players who kneeled during the national anthem before an exhibition game Thursday.

Michael Sabbie
Huffington Post

A video has surfaced of an inmate who died at a privately run Texarkana jail more than a year ago. It shows 35- year-old Michael Sabbie, who was pepper sprayed and restrained, repeatedly telling corrections officers that he could not breathe. He died a short time later.

State Rep. John Walker (D-Little Rock).
Pulaski County Sheriff's Office

Democratic state lawmaker and civil rights attorney John Walker was arrested on Monday for obstructing governmental operations. 

Arkansas League of the South Chair R.G. Miller (right) in Batesville in 2015 working alongside the loosely defined heritage movement to restore a Confederate Flag on a courthouse lawn.
facebook.com

The modern day white Southern secessionist movement in Arkansas spent most of Saturday at the Conway Public Library. It wasn't just the thousands of publicly supported books and assorted educational materials that drew in the Southern nationalists, it was the first state conference of the Arkansas League of the South.

As a former civil rights attorney and now as a legal scholar and historian, Gloria Browne Marshall is no stranger to the restrictions American voters have faced in Southern states and elsewhere. Marshall is a professor at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the City University of New York and  she is the author of The Voting Rights War: The NAACP and the Struggle for Justice.

Marshall spoke Friday evening in Little Rock about the state of voting rights and voter suppression past and present. 

Judge Wendell Griffen at Truthful Tuesday on the steps of the state Capitol in 2014.
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR News

Judge Wendell Griffen is calling some of Little Rock’s most prominent black leaders “enablers” of a “deeply racist” system following a failed vote to require police officers to live in the city they have pledged to protect. The Little Rock City Board of Directors voted down a residency requirement on Tuesday along racial lines but approved a package offering incentives for living in the city to new hires across all the city’s departments.

(from left) Gov. Asa Hutchinson, Mervin Jebaraj, assistant director of the Center for Business and Economic Research; Sherman Tate, state Urban League board chair; and Ken Wade, executive director of the Urban League of the State of Arkansas.
Steve Brawner / Talk Business and Politics

Poverty rates increased for African Americans in Little Rock from 2010-13 while median incomes for all races dropped in Fort Smith over that time period, according to a report released Thursday (Sept. 1) by the state’s Urban League chapter.

Secretary interior Sally jewell transportation secretary Anthony Foxx National Park Service Ranger Jodi Morris
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Two members of President Obama’s cabinet visited Little Rock Tuesday, getting a firsthand look at the historic Central High School. It was part of a commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service.

Sarah Whites-Koditschek / KUAR

A federal lawsuit alleges twelve percent of the city of Sherwood is being funded through predatory practices of a bad checks court system.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Arkansas partnered with the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law to file the case against the city and Pulaski County.  

Attorney Bettina Brownstein says the city imposes a ceaseless punishment of jail time and escalating fines for those who write bad checks and can’t cover the cost of an initial court fine.

Pages