Arkansas Crime

An Arkansas man accused of killing a sheriff's deputy and two other people was ordered jailed without bond Monday after entering a not-guilty plea on three charges of capital murder.

James Arthur Bowden is accused in last week's killings of Yell County Sheriff's Deputy Lt. Kevin Mainhart, 61-year-old Rita Miller and 17-year-old Ciera Miller. Family members have said the Millers were relatives of Bowden's girlfriend.

Authorities say an Arkansas man faces three counts of capital murder in the killing of three people, including a sheriff's deputy who was fatally shot during a traffic stop.

State Police said Friday that 42-year-old James Arthur Bowden was jailed Thursday afternoon after a five-hour standoff at a home in a rural area near Dardanelle, about 65 miles (105 kilometers) west of Little Rock.

Bill Sadler Arkansas State Police
KATV, Channel 7 News

UPDATE 3:30pm: The Arkansas State Police say the suspect in the killing of a sheriff's deputy and two other people has been taken into custody.

The agency did not release details about the suspect or how the suspect was captured.

Authorities say the suspect is believed to have killed Lt. Kevin C. Mainhart, of the Yell County Sheriff's Office, early Thursday during a traffic stop he made near Dardanelle, which is about 65 miles (105 kilometers) west of Little Rock. He had been heading to check on a call about a disturbance.

Federal prosecutors say three former Arkansas juvenile detention officers have been indicted for allegedly conspiring to assault at least four juvenile inmates.

Acting U.S. Attorney Patrick Harris announced Friday that a grand jury had indicted 26-year-old Will Ray, 47-year-old Thomas Farris and 42-year-old Jason Benton.

Investigators say the assaults took place at the White River Juvenile Detention Center in Batesville between 2012 and 2013.

Tony Alamo
KATV, Channel 7 News

Disgraced preacher Tony Alamo, who was convicted in Arkansas of sexually abusing girls he considered his wives, has died in a North Carolina prison. He was 82.

The U.S. Bureau of Prisons says Alamo died Tuesday while in a federal prison hospital in Butner, North Carolina. Alamo was convicted in 2009 of taking underage girls across state lines for sex, including a 9-year-old. He was sentenced to 175 years in prison.

Two former supervisors at an Arkansas juvenile detention facility Wednesday pleaded guilty for conspiracy to assault detainees. Patrick Harris, the acting U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Arkansas, announced that 42-year old Peggy Kendrick and 40-year old Dennis Fuller each entered guilty pleas for their actions at the White River Juvenile Detention Center in Batesville.

Arkansas prison officials have asked the state's highest court to stay a judge's order that they must disclose more information about one of the drugs they plan to use in the executions of eight men over a 10-day period in April.

The attorney general's office on Friday asked the state Supreme Court to issue a stay of Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen's order requiring Arkansas to release copies of the package insert and labels for its supply of potassium chloride, one of the three drugs used in its lethal injection protocol.

A lawyer is trying to obtain information about the drugs Arkansas will use in an unprecedented run of executions next month, but prison officials say the information is a secret they must keep.

Steven Shults was in court Thursday seeking the drugs' packing labels. The prison officials say that, after The Associated Press previously used labels to identify drugmakers, they will no longer distribute them.

One of eight Arkansas death row inmates facing lethal injection next month is asking the state's highest court to block his execution so evidence from his murder trial can be retested.

Stacey Eugene Johnson asked the state Supreme Court Wednesday to stay his execution scheduled for April 20, one of the four double execution dates the state has set over a 10-day period.

Johnson asked justices to allow him to seek new testing of evidence from his conviction in the 1993 death of Carol Heath. The evidence includes hairs found at Heath's apartment.

Governor's Office / YouTube

Gov. Asa Hutchinson has signed into law a high profile bill that greatly expands where concealed carry license holders can bring handguns.

The Republican governor made his announcement flanked by several GOP lawmakers and an executive with the National Rifle Association, all of whom helped shape the new law. Hutchinson said the final legislation wasn’t perfect but the group around him balanced the need for safety and Second Amendment rights.

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