Arkansas Environment

Arkansas' four U.S. representatives are asking the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to hold a field hearing in Arkansas on the agency's proposed carbon rule.

The EPA rules announced June 2 set a goal of cutting carbon dioxide emissions by 30 percent nationwide from 2005 levels. The goal's deadline is 2030.

A meeting is set at which utilities and Arkansas officials are to discuss new federal rules that are to reduce carbon pollution.

The state Public Service Commission and the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality are to hold the public meeting at 9 a.m. June 25 at the ADEQ office in North Little Rock.

The new federal rules restrict carbon pollution from existing power plants. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency plans to have a final set of rules in place by July 1, 2015.

An Arkansas electric cooperative says an Environmental Protection Agency plan to limit greenhouse gas emissions from power plants will reduce utility companies' use of coal in favor of more expensive fuels.

The Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corporation says it was disappointed by the implications of Monday's announcement by the Obama administration to cut carbon dioxide emissions from plants over the next 15 years.

The University of Arkansas' Division of Agriculture says there is an abundance ticks this spring in Arkansas.

The statement comes on the heels of the death in neighboring Oklahoma of a man who had a virus spread through tick bites.

Extension entomologist Kelly Loftin says lone star ticks and American dog ticks are particularly prevalent. A Delaware, Oklahoma, man died from the Heartland virus - which is linked to the lone star tick.

Other ticks in Arkansas include the blacklegged tick, the winter tick, the Gulf Coast tick and the brown dog tick.

Students and faculty at Arkansas Tech University in Russellville are to conduct an assessment of the biology of tributaries to Lake Maumelle, the water source for much of central Arkansas.

Assistant biology professor Rosemary Burk is to lead the group of science students in assessing changes to the water system. The collected data from the project announced Thursday will be provided to the utility Central ArkansasWater.

The study is being funded by $10,000 from Central Arkansas Water and the Arkansas Center for Energy, Natural Resources and Environmental Studies.

Next week the Environmental Protection Agency is to release a first draft of rules to limit carbon emissions for existing power plants.

Glen Hooks with the Sierra Club of Arkansas says it will be an important first step toward improving air quality in the state.

Federal officials plan to tour several projects in eastern Arkansas that are reducing water and nutrient pollution in the Mississippi Delta.

Officials with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Agriculture will join state and local leaders on a series of tours Tuesday. The officials will visit farms in Stuttgart and also stop by the 5 Oaks Duck Lodge and Hollowell Reservoir at Bayou Meto.

At each stop, farmers and experts will discuss strategies to reduce the amount of nitrogen and phosphorus that reach waterways and the Mississippi Delta.

The Environmental Protection Agency says Clean Harbors El Dorado L.L.C. has agreed to pay a more than $581,000 penalty for improperly identifying and disposing of hazardous waste; improper storage of hazardous waste; and failure to comply with air emissions standards at its plant in El Dorado.

The EPA says the violations were discovered during inspections.

Ways To Help In The Aftermath Of Arkansas Tornado

May 1, 2014
tornado damage
James Bryant

Many groups are working to provide assistance to Arkansans impacted by the recent tornado that caused extensive destruction.

Below is a list of some of the places to donate money, clothes, food, blood, furniture, to get emergency phones and WiFi, to get help with pet, and to find shelters.

Where to donate:

The Arkansas Community Foundation is taking donations to be distributed to various non-profit organizations that are helping tornado victims in the state.

CNG alternative fuel compressed natural gas
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

A station offering compressed natural gas is now open in Little Rock. The alternative fuel is expected to save the city and public money.

Gov. Mike Beebe and city leaders came together for a ribbon cutting ceremony Tuesday.  Afterward, there was a symbolic fueling of city vehicles at the station alongside Interstate 30 near 6th Street.

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