Arkansas Politics

Donald Trump speaking at Barton Coliseum in Little Rock, Arkansas.
Brian Chilson / Arkansas Times

Two Republican Arkansas officials who spoke on behalf of GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump during the Republican National Convention and a GOP U.S. senator running for re-election are not joining the call for Trump to leave the race after lewd comments he made in 2005 came to light.

-Two vice-presidential candidates exchange verbal punches in their first and only debate. Meanwhile, Arkansas’s Junior US Senator Tom Cotton visits Iow. 2020 on the mind?

-A man dies in a Texarkana jail. A newly released video shows a struggle with guards and pleas of “I can’t breathe.”

-Oil and Gas Industry representatives mingle with Arkansas politicians in Little Rock. From whence doth the energy flow?

-An invasive beetle further endangers Ash trees in Arkansas.

- And a celebrated east Arkansas Blues Festival kicks off.

Interstate Oil Gas Compact Commission
David Monteith / KUAR News

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin and Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson agree that energy policy needs to be included in the national political debate. But they disagree on a controversial transmission line project that would move wind energy from the Oklahoma panhandle to western Tennessee.

Fallin is the 2016 chairman of the Interstate Oil Gas Compact Commission. Hutchinson will become chairman next year. Both governors spoke Monday at the group's annual conference.

Mental Health
Mid South Health Systems

Funding cuts for mental health services through Medicaid are taking effect October 1, despite a last-ditch effort at the state legislature Friday to walk back a change that some say could have dire consequences.

The cuts, finalized last week, would limit group therapy length from an hour and a half to an hour and set a cap of 25 counseling visits per year for Medicaid recipients who might otherwise go every week.

The vote to revisit the decision failed to gain two thirds from the Arkansas Legislative Council Friday morning.

ariel martini / flickr.com

Eighty-seven of the state’s 135 legislators, or 64.4%, have announced their opposition to Issue 5, which would create a constitutional amendment authorizing its sponsors to open three casinos in Arkansas.

Talk Business & Politics reports:

marijuana
npr.org

Arkansas voters have split attitudes on two medical marijuana proposals with few undecideds, according to the latest Talk Business & Politics-Hendrix College survey.

The poll, conducted among 831 likely Arkansas voters on September 15-17, 2016, shows one medical marijuana proposal with a plurality of support, while a second ballot issue has a small majority against it. The survey has a margin of error of 3.4%.

Voters were asked:

Donald Trump speaking at Barton Coliseum in Little Rock, Arkansas.
Brian Chilson / Arkansas Times

A new Talk Business & Politics-Hendrix College survey shows that Republican Presidential nominee Donald Trump has widened his lead over Democrat Hillary Clinton by another 10 points from late June.

A view of the Jefferson County Courthouse in Pine Bluff from inside the historic, but crumbling Hotel Pines.
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

A Pine Bluff alderman whose proposed ordinance to require city department heads to live within city limits says he may wait to next year to bring the issue back after it’s expected to get a mayoral veto Thursday. The ordinance, sponsored by Ward 4 Alderman Steven Mays, passed 5-3 this week. Pine Bluff Mayor Debe Hollingsworth has promised to veto it.

Mays says he believes the ordinance is a step toward creating a positive attitude among leaders in a place that’s faced a declining population in recent years.

Gov. Mike Beebe
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Beebe is opposing a ballot measure that would legalize casinos in three counties.

Protect Arkansas Values/Stop Casinos Now announced Wednesday the former Democratic governor is opposing the proposed constitutional measure that's on the Nov. 8 ballot. Beebe said in a statement released by the group that he believes the measure would not give local communities the right to decide whether they want expanded gambling.

Senator John Boozman
Talk Business & Politics

Beyond budget bills and Zika funding, Sen. John Boozman, R-Arkansas, says he thinks infrastructure funding will find its way into law before an October recess. The state’s senior senator also explained his position on overseas travel, an upcoming debate, and controversies in the Presidential race.

Pages